Border Collie Corgi Mix: Borgi Breed Info, Puppy Costs & More

. If you’re looking for a hybrid herding dog, the Border Collie Corgi mix, also known as the Borgi, the pup is the right one! Although we say likely because you should read our complete guide, he is so adaptable that he would be a good fit for most families. The Borgi is our favorite of the variety of Corgi ,.

He is a happy, go-lucky dog who enjoys cuddles and attention. He is sociable, but thanks to his Collie’s aloofness he is not too in-your-face as some would say. He is an intelligent, well-balanced dog who excels in both the Border Collie as the Corgi.

His main needs should be taken into account. He requires a lot of exercise, grooming, and time spent with his family. Read on to see if this is something you can offer him.

Border Collie Corgi Mix

Parent Breeds

To understand the Borgi, and what you can expect from him, we need to know a little more about his parents.

Border Collie

The Border Collie is from across the pond , in the highlands, of Wales and Scotland. He is not the original herding breed, but a mixture of all of them to make the perfect herding dogs . He is also the smartest of all canines, and he must be placed with someone who will take care of his brain. He is described as affectionate, smart and energetic, and he is happiest when he has a job to do.

In 2020, the American Kennel Club has ranked the breed as the 35th most popular dog breed in America. The Royals love him and Sharp, Queen Victoria’s Border Collie, is her favorite dog. The Border Collie has become a popular designer dog parent in its own right, as the lineage of the Border Collie Lab mix, and the Border Collie Rottweiler mix.

Corgi

The Corgi is a great herding dog. His small stature is a surprise, but it’s his ability to do it well that makes him so special. His sociable and fun nature also makes him a great family companion, and being that the AKC has ranked the breed as the 13th most popular breed in America, shows just how popular he is. Whilst he is from Wales in England, he is very popular with both Royalty and the masses across the world, and his cheerful face and fluffy butt also makes him a social media sensation.

There are two types of Corgi, the Pembroke and the Cardigan, and the Borgi could be bred from either, and if you are not sure on the difference check out our Pembroke and Cardigan Corgi guide that explains it all. The word Corgi means ‘dwarf dog’ in Welsh, but there is nothing small about this guy’s bubbly personality! The Corgi is a common designer dog parent, helping create many mixes like the Horgi or the Porgi.

The Borgi

Whilst many do not agree with the idea of a designer dog, nor can you 100% guarantee what characteristics he will inherit from his parents, the Borgi tends to take the best bits from each parent to make a more balanced dog that would suit most families.

Temperament

The Borgi is a social dog who enjoys being with his family. He may seem a bit shy around strangers at first because he is a follower of his Border Collie parents. However, his Corgi parents are very outgoing and he will soon get to know them. This also means that they hate to be left alone for long periods of time, so if you can’t spend most of your day with him then he may not be the dog breed for you.

Because he loves his humans so much you can be sure that you are in for a lot of cuddles and doggy kisses. You can expect lots of love and fun from this pooch. When he is not herding, he is playing games and getting up to mischief. He has the cheekiness and intelligence of a Border Collie. You can expect him to be quite mischievous. He is always up for a game or two of fetch or tug-of-war, and there will never seem to be a dull moment when he’s with the Borgi.

Both of the Borgi’s parents are herding dogs, and definitely two of the best around, so you can expect that the Borgi will inherit the urge to herd. This is a great choice if you’re looking for a ranch dog. However, if your goal is to have a companion, you might find that he attempts to herd younger children and other pets.

Size & Appearance

The Borgi typically looks like a Corgi, with the long body and short legs, but with the black and white fur of the Collie, and the longer tail too. He will measure between 10 and 21 inches from paw to shoulder, and weigh between 30 and 40 pounds.

He usually inherits the wide smile and cheeky face of the Corgi, and the larger than life triangle shaped ears that stand to attention, as well as the short legs that turn out slightly too.

Coat & Colors

The coat of the Borgi typically takes after the Border Collie, in that it is much longer and thicker, but with this comes a lot more shedding! His double coat will keep him warm while he works on the ranch and also keep you warm on the couch or in bed if it is a lucky boy.

His color is usually black with white highlights ,, just like his Border Collie parent. However, he can take on brown or brindle hues that are similar to his Corgi parent.

Exercise & Living Conditions

The Borgi can be described as a fluffy, bouncy dog with lots of energy. He will need at least 60 minutes of intense exercise every day, otherwise he will have a lot of pent up energy that he will need to get rid of in other ways, namely your sofa and other prized possessions of yours.

Ideally, he would love to be placed with a family that can offer him a job on a ranch, but if not plenty of exercise, interactive sessions and brain games will keep him occupied. Being super intelligent and agile he would thrive on an agility course, so take him to a local course to switch things up a bit.

Being a small to medium sized dog who is relatively short, he would be suited to homes of any size, just as long as they have a yard and he receives the adequate amount of exercise every day. If you do have a house with stairs, be sure to keep an eye on him, or even get a stair gate, because his long spine and short legs means he is prone to injuries when jumping up and down the stairs or on and off of sofas etc. Doggy ramps are a common method of transport for Dachshunds and Corgis.

Just like any dog, as long as he is socialized well as a pup he does well with other dogs and family pets. Although he loves children, you should remember that he is a herding animal and may try to herd them. This behavior should not be tolerated. Many Corgi, Collie, and Borgi owners agree that it is not a problem if handled properly.

Training

The Borgi needs to be socialized well as a puppy to ensure that he learns his doggy manners and grows into a polite pooch. Whilst Borgi’s are rarely possessive or protective, they may try to herd, so this needs to be monitored and discouraged if they are not going to be worked as a herding dog.

The Borgi is a very anxious animal. As such, you need to get him a secure place to call home. It may even help to get one specifically designed for separation anxiety. You will need to groom him every day. It is important to start this training program early on. Be sure to reward him with treats and praise every time. If you plan to train with a harness, make sure you get one that’s specifically suited to pups with a corgi shaped body.

Health

The Borgi is a relatively healthy dog who enjoys a lifespan of 12 to 14 years. He is a mixed dog and can be at risk of health issues that could affect his parents.

Hip Dysplasia – this is caused by the abnormal formation of his hip joint which causes increased and painful grinding of the joints, which eventually leads to decreased mobility and painful arthritis.

Intervertebral Disc Disease – also known more simply as IVDD, this disease affects those dogs who are shaped like the Corgi with his longer spine and shorter legs. This happens when one of the spine discs bursts. It can cause severe pain or paralysis. This is a reason why he should be cautious when jumping from high places.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy – also known as PRA, this is where the condition of the retina deteriorates over time which can lead to total blindness.

Nutrition

Ensure that the Borgi is fed high-quality dry food. All dogs should eat dry kibble, but particularly those with smaller jaws, as they are more susceptible to periodontal disease. The dry kibble helps to reduce plaque that starts to build up.

Being active, it is likely that he will require nutrition that is rich in energy and protein to sustain him throughout the day. He will typically consume 2 to 2 1/2 cups of kibble each day .. He will eat as much as his Corgi parents, and he’ll be hungry all day.

Grooming

The Borgi will likely inherit the Collie coat, and as such he will need to be brushed several times a week throughout the year, and during shedding season he will likely need brushing every day simply to keep his coat manageable. Because he has a thick double coat, be sure to check out our deshedding tool guide, where you’ll find the perfect tool.

He’ll need to brush his teeth with doggy toothpaste every week to prevent periodontal disease. Also, make sure you check his ears each week as they can often get a lot dirt. If your dog doesn’t like grooming, you can make it enjoyable by giving him a treat.

Puppies

The cost of a Borgi puppy will set you back anywhere between $500 and $1,000. Although he’s not as well-known as other designer dogs, Corgi mix are growing in popularity. The Borgi, with his Border Collie intelligence, is no exception. You should not buy a Borgi that is cheaper or more expensive than the guide price. They are likely to be part of a puppy farm.

As Family Pets

The Borgi is full of bouncy energy and needs to be placed with a family that can either work him on a ranch, or a very active family who can guarantee him at least 60 minutes of vigorous exercise every day. Although he may be shy around strangers, he quickly becomes a social butterfly. The Borgi comes from two herding families and will be a great herder. Be sure to keep an eye on him to ensure he doesn’t herd small children or pets.

Being super social means that he hates being left alone for long periods of the day. He needs to be surrounded by people who will not leave him. Socialization is crucial to help your dog become a calm, well-mannered pet.

The coat of the Borgi will require brushing every day to keep it clean. This is something you should consider when starting a new routine with him. You need to keep an eye on his energy and make sure he does not jump off of stairs or sofas. Otherwise, you could risk IVDD and injury.

Finding and Using a Borgi-Borer

Start by searching online for Borgi breeders in your area. However, you will need to be willing to travel to find reputable breeders. It is important to complete your own research, and look for reviews from other customers if you can find them. You should also meet the breeder and their puppies in person. If you have a negative feeling, it is important to trust your gut.

Whilst there are no breed standards for the Borgi as of yet, a reputable breeder will only breed Border Collies and Corgis who are very healthy, and those that pass all of their own breed health checks, so ask to see their health certificates too.

Rescue & Shelters

If you would like to rescue a Borgi then you should head out to a few of your local rescue centers. Although this is a new breed, there won’t be many of them. However, if you are persistent in checking and visiting, you’ll soon find your dog’s soulmate. Additionally, be sure to check out the Border Collie Rescue website, or the Corgi Aid website, where information can be found for dedicated breed centers who also house mixed breeds too.

Final Thoughts

The Borgi is a wonderful companion for his family. He provides all the love, affection and games they need. He is social, but not overly so, and hardworking, but he can also relax with his owners. He is a great ranch companion and companion, although his exercise needs are not negotiable.

Becky Roberts

Becky Roberts

One of Becky's favourite things to do every morning is to browse the top pet-related forums, looking for issues and questions that people have. She then shortlists the most common ones, and turns them into blog posts for Fuzzy Rescue. She's had over 4 cats and 2 dogs over the past decade, so she does know a thing or 2 about raising/training, and more importantly, loving them. She's the only one on our team that doesn't like coffee, but it seems to us she really doesn't need more energy :). We're very fortunate to have her on board as she does most of the heavy listing for the site, outputting an insane amount of content each month. Read More

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